teachingtreats:

muchadoaboutteaching:

wildwildeyes:

Good read. I needed this after this week.

Don’t forget, we do this because we care. I feel like I need that reminder sometimes. Not because I stopped caring, but because I get so caught up in all the worry and stress and panic that it makes me lose focus on it in ways I don’t want it to.

But to be honest, I don’t remember half the lessons I’ve planned and ran this  past fall, yet I will never forget one of my students thanking me after class one day for staying after school and helping them with an essay that got them into college.

I probably need to print this article and read it weekly.

Wow, so relevant.

ambedu:

tcmtoday:

Great idea: How to manage your turn-in tray using clothespins - a simple and inexpensive way to see who has handed in their homework and figure out who handed in that no-name assignment!
Source: 2nd Grade Stuff Blog


I wish something like this would work in middle school.

ambedu:

tcmtoday:

Great idea: How to manage your turn-in tray using clothespins - a simple and inexpensive way to see who has handed in their homework and figure out who handed in that no-name assignment!

Source: 2nd Grade Stuff Blog

I wish something like this would work in middle school.

(Source: teachercreatedmaterials)

hisnamewasbeanni:

wincherella:

So today was Kingdom Day in my classroom. Every Friday the students meet in their Kingdom groups to complete challenges together. We focus on teamwork, cooperation, critical thinking, with a little competition thrown in.

Today the challenge was to use “special” building tools to create battlements. The building tool consisted of an elastic band with a piece of string for each group member tied to it, spaced evenly around the elastic. The building blocks were red solo cups.
The students were only allowed to touch their piece of string. Working together they had to unstack the cups and restack them in specific formations. The first challenge was to stack them using six cups in a 3,2,1 formation. If they touched the cups with their hands, they forfeited points.
The second challenge was to use ten cups.
There were two groups missing some members and were trying to do this with only three people. I decided to scramble one group, who then had to join another group to make all the groups number six.
Then I gave them 13 cups and told them the had to build battlements but they had to be even. They struggled with this for awhile because 13 is not even, but eventually they realized they needed to combine and work together to do this
The concentration and collaboration was amazing. Kids that usually hang back were taking on some leadership roles, quiet kids were sharing ideas and being heard, everyone was cooperating and helping each other.
I invited my principal to come and observe and he was amazed at how well my “unruly” class was working together. He loved the idea of the challenge and how they had to work together to be successful. He agreed that we don’t have to and shouldn’t just teach curriculum. These types of activities are just as important as covering the curriculum expectations.
An awesome Friday afternoon and positive end to the week.

Oh my god this is so damn cool.

Note to self:

Hurry up and write that extremely long post about your second practical at the remote school. You have been putting it off for 3 months and the details are getting a little hazy. 

Whoops sorry everyone.

live-laugh-love-georgia:

It was my first day of the SCIL Pathway today which means I am back to being Miss McLean.
Long story short, the SCIL Pathway stands for School-Community Integrated Learning Pathway, and involves volunteering every week and then completing your teaching practicals and internship at the same school. This allows you to follow the class over an entire year.
I was lucky enough to receive a placement at a lovely inner-city school close to my home. I’m looking forward to being in a new school environment while working with gifted and high-achieving students.
Here’s to 2014. My fourth and final year of university.

From my personal blog

live-laugh-love-georgia:

It was my first day of the SCIL Pathway today which means I am back to being Miss McLean.

Long story short, the SCIL Pathway stands for School-Community Integrated Learning Pathway, and involves volunteering every week and then completing your teaching practicals and internship at the same school. This allows you to follow the class over an entire year.

I was lucky enough to receive a placement at a lovely inner-city school close to my home. I’m looking forward to being in a new school environment while working with gifted and high-achieving students.

Here’s to 2014. My fourth and final year of university.

From my personal blog

itsssnix:

So this is shamelessly copied from the picture I’ve seen on here - but I hated the font and felt like some of the questions were juvenile. Plus it printed blurry, so I thought it was time for an update.
Let’s hope they like it.

itsssnix:

So this is shamelessly copied from the picture I’ve seen on here - but I hated the font and felt like some of the questions were juvenile. Plus it printed blurry, so I thought it was time for an update.

Let’s hope they like it.

(via from-tutor-to-teacher)

live-laugh-love-georgia:

I AM STILL ALIVE!
I am currently on my teaching prac in the remote town of Clermont in Central QLD. It has been amazing. I have a fantastic host teacher and have learnt so much. It is also so great to be back in the bush. I am about an hour away from where I grew up and I forgot how pretty it is out here. I took this photo on the weekend. Isn’t it gorgeous? 
It is my last day on Monday (and also my 21st birthday). Expect a billion teaching posts as soon as I get back to Brisbane and normal internet.
Xx

From my personal blog (I’m still here guys!)

live-laugh-love-georgia:

I AM STILL ALIVE!

I am currently on my teaching prac in the remote town of Clermont in Central QLD. It has been amazing. I have a fantastic host teacher and have learnt so much. It is also so great to be back in the bush. I am about an hour away from where I grew up and I forgot how pretty it is out here. I took this photo on the weekend. Isn’t it gorgeous? 

It is my last day on Monday (and also my 21st birthday). Expect a billion teaching posts as soon as I get back to Brisbane and normal internet.

Xx

From my personal blog (I’m still here guys!)

Check out the amazing bulletin boards I made today! 

The Bungawitta one is for a new literacy unit, and the Hot! Hot! Hot! board is for our science unit on heat.

The joys of being a prac student.

Check out the amazing bulletin boards I made today! The Bungawitta one is for a new literacy unit, and the Hot! Hot! Hot! board is for our science unit on heat. The joys of being a prac student.

i-likeyourfunnyhat:

averageface:

there’s nothing that says “australia’s weather is messed up” quite like the fact that our fire danger system doesnt just stop at “extreme”

image

and that the second lowest setting is ‘high’

(via wildandwild)

Dear Student Teachers

wonderfulslumber:

As someone who finished their student teaching last fall, and is starting their first year as a lead teacher at the elementary level, and is currently feeling very overwhelmed and lost/confused, here is some advice for you: 

1) Ask a lot of questions, even the dumb ones. If you don’t know what an acronym stands for, ask! If you don’t know how to handle a situation with a difficult student, ask! If you are unsure how a student’s IEP is being followed, ask! If you aren’t sure how to word something to a parent, ask! Also ask why teachers chose to have the structures and procedures that they do, like the organizational systems, the chairs, tables rather than desks, the decorative aspects of the classroom. I wish I had asked a lot more questions, especially those concerning balancing personal life/work. Also ask where they buy the things that they have! That will save you a lot of time from spending hours going to store to store the weekend before you start teaching. Also figure out how they were able to adhere the things they have, like if they’re using velcro, magnetic tape, mounting tap, to hang up posters, attach name tags, etc. 

2) Take criticism in stride. Don’t feel like you’re being too harshly criticized or feel like your mentor is unfairly judging your teaching. And don’t get pouty when they try to offer you constructive feedback; your mentor is there to support you to become a better teacher! You will appreciate that they were honest and upfront with you, rather than telling you what you wanted to hear. 

3) You’re supposed to be bad at teaching in the beginning. You’ve never done it before, and no one is good at teaching when they first get started. The sooner you come to terms with how bad you are, the sooner you can get better at it. Reflection is the key to getting better at teaching. 

4) Take a multi-vitamin, eat lunch, and get a lot of rest. If this is your first time being around kids for an extended period of time, you will get sick. a lot. I was sick every other week. 

5) Talk to other staff in your school, and appreciate the community/support that you have, especially among your classmates. If you are hired at a school like mine, you will miss gripe sessions with people who are in similar situations and who understand what it is like to be a new teacher who has little idea of what they are doing. And if you are student teaching with other student teachers, it is very nice to have them as a support system, but you will learn more if you talk to actual in-service teachers. 

6) Photocopy and take pictures of everything your mentor teacher is doing, especially of routines that are in place. I didn’t realize that when I would be starting as a new teacher, that I would be starting from scratch. I very wrongly assumed that I would remember the first day of school games, activities, and procedures we went over, but I didn’t, and documenting these things would have saved me a lot of time googling. 

7) Ask to observe teachers other than your co-op, especially in other grade levels. There will be talented, veteran teachers in your school who have excellent control of their classroom and plan engaging lessons for their students, both of which you will want to emulate. It is hard to mimic what you haven’t gotten a chance to see. There is also the very likely possibility that you will get hired in a grade level different from the one you student taught in. For example, in third grade, we never did morning meetings. Now that I’m in first, I have a limited idea of how to make my morning meetings and calendar time flow in an engaging way for my students, or what a first grade classroom should feel like. 

8) Say yes to everything, teaching-wise. Don’t feel like you aren’t ready to take over lead teaching for every subject, and then not teach everything. As a full-time teacher, you will be teaching everything, and it will be hard for you to adjust to that if you haven’t had that experience. When I was student teaching, I taught 90% of the time, but I wish I had gotten a chance to teach the rest of that 10%, because that is where my weaknesses are. 

9) Take part in administrative things that are separate from the actual teaching. Grade papers/quizzes, input grades, write letters home, correspond with parents, sit in on I&RS and IEP meetings…while these things aren’t typically associated with the responsibilities of a lead teacher, you will need to know how to do these things when you finally do become a teacher, and you will be glad that you are ready for them when the time comes. 

10) I really ran out of steam during the last one, so just enjoy it! Get to know your kids. They are adorable, and you will miss them. They are the first students that you will ever really have, and let them know how much you care about them, too. 

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